“Common Myths Of Hospice Care Debunked”

This article is about five of the common myths and misconceptions associated with hospice care. Many are reluctant to learn about hospice until they are in need of the service leaving a gap in understanding which makes the decision to start even more difficult. The five common myths are as follows:

  1. Hospice places a time limit on patient stays and hastens death.
  2. People have to go to hospice centers in order to receive hospice care.
  3. Hospice care requires you to stop taking medications.
  4. Hospice depends on sedation as a major way to manage patients’ pain.
  5. Once you’re enrolled in a hospice program, there’s no turning back.

To learn more about each see the full article below:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2015/02/25/common-myths-of-hospice-care-debunked/#ef8268645277

“Treating PSP, MSA, and CBD – What can be done?” Webinar Scheduled for February 27th

Stanford University and Brain Support Network are co-hosting
another webinar next month on treating progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, and corticobasal degeneration. The webinar is scheduled for Wednesday, February 27th, 3-4pm PT. Please register in advance.

Details are:

Treating PSP, MSA, and CBD – What can be done?

When:
Wednesday, February 27, 3-4pm Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Speaker:
Brent Bluett, DO, movement disorders specialist, Stanford Movement
Disorders Center

Dr. Bluett will address these topics:

* What symptoms of PSP, MSA, and CBD are amenable to improvement?
* How can physical therapy, occupational therapy, exercise, and
assisted devices help?
* What about eye movement training?
* What about botox?
* What are some eating and drinking strategies?
* How can you ask your neurologist about these treatments?

Those coping with advanced Parkinson’s Disease or Lewy body dementia may find some aspects of this webinar useful.

Register in advance for this (free) webinar.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the webinar.

________________________________

Further details on the speaker:

The speaker is Dr. Brent Bluett, a movement disorders specialist at
Stanford University.  He is an expert on atypical parkinsonism
disorders.  He is the director of the Stanford Center of Excellence
for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.  Dr. Bluett’s research focuses on
fall prevention in all movement disorders.  He received NIH grant
funding to explore freezing of gait in Parkinson’s Disease, in order
to better understand the underlying pathophysiology.

________________________________

Further details on the webinar host:

The webinar will be hosted by Sharon Reichardt Walker, whose late
husband Den had progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), confirmed
through brain donation. She is a longtime member of Brain Support
Network, a nonprofit focused on the four atypical parkinsonism
disorders, including PSP, multiple system atrophy, corticobasal
degeneration, and Lewy body dementia. Sharon has spoken about the
importance of brain donation for research and the challenges of being a PSP caregiver to support groups and conferences.

________________________________

There will be time for questions-and-answers with Dr. Bluett and Ms.
Reichardt Walker.

If you can’t make it on February 27th, we encourage you to register
for the webinar so that you will be alerted when the recording is
available online.

Brain Support Network, the co-organizer, will be posting notes from
Dr. Bluett’s presentation and the Q-and-A to its website within a few
days of the webinar.
________________________________

Questions?

Please contact Robin Riddle, Brain Support Network.

Best of the BSN Blog 2018

As we celebrate the beginning of a new year, we wanted to share our most visited blog posts and articles from 2018. It is our hope that we have provided meaningful resources to those with neurological disorders, their families, and their caregivers.

Please feel welcome to share your thoughts and suggestions about future content with our support staff.

Join our email mailing list to receive relevant articles concerning the four atypical parkinsonism disorders and caregiving directly to your inbox.

 


OUR TOP POSTS OF 2018


 

Apps to increase vocal loudness and improve fluency (speech therapist’s favorites)

 

PSP Stages/Phases, by two caregivers

 

 

“Cannabis and Parkinson’s Disease” – Lecture Notes

 

 

Constant groaning in PSP (case report)

 

 

Caregiver Stress Syndrome: Identifying Symptoms, Finding Solutions

 

 

“Applause sign” to diagnose PSP?

 

 

Webinar Notes – Hallucinations and delusions in LBD

 

 

Mayo Rochester finally reports results from mesenchymal stem cell study in MSA

 

Sharon’s Treatment Regimen for CBD

 

 

Five types of PSP and diagnostic challenges

 

 

Stress Symptoms, Signs, and Causes: Improving Your Ability to Handle Stress

 

“Are you a healthy caregiver” – 10 question test

 

 

Five Approximate Phases of Lewy Body Dementia (as seen by caregivers)

 

“Persisting in the Face of Caregiver Difficulties” – Webinar Notes

Support Brain Research With Your Donated Stock

Donating long-term appreciated securities to BSN benefits families affected by neurological disorders and potentially you as well! Gifts of long-term appreciated securities may have tax advantages that could maximize your gift and reduce your taxes.

Potential benefits of donating stock may include:

  • Reducing federal and state tax on the capital gain;
  • Receiving an income tax deduction (federal and most states) for the full-market value of the gift if you itemize deductions on your tax return and have held the assets one year or longer;
  • Making a larger gift at a lower original cost to you.

Please contact BSN at +1 650-814-0848 with any questions about donating stock. Please send email to [email protected].

Prefer to make a traditional contribution via credit card? Click here to donate.

Webinar – Preventing Burnout for the Dementia Caregiver

FCA’s August Webinar: Preventing Burnout for the Dementia Caregiver

When: Wednesday August 29, 11 a.m. to 12 noon (PT)
Where: ONLINE
Cost: No charge
Contact: Calvin Hu, [email protected], (415) 434-3388 x 313
Registration: Click here

Any kind of work, regardless of how enjoyable or personally meaningful it may be, can lead to burnout. And, it is well-documented that the stress of caregiving, especially without respite or a predictable conclusion, often leads to health problems, including depression and cardiovascular disease. Quality of life and the ability to care for a family member or friend can be at risk. At the same time, caregivers often view self-care, hobbies, and enjoyment of pastimes as inaccessible or as an unnecessary indulgence. Preventing Burnout for the Dementia Caregiver will help caregivers understand the importance of self-care and how it can foster positive caregiving experiences, without burnout. Strategies for guilt-free, self-care will be discussed.

Objectives:

  • Learn about the concept of burnout as a predictable result of certain patterns of experience
  • Learn how burnout affects dementia caregivers’ health, well-being, and capacity to provide care
  • Identify strategies for preventing burnout and improving care

 


About the Speaker: Daniel Paulson, PhD

Dr. Daniel Paulson is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Central Florida. His primary clinical interests include caregiving and dementia evaluation of older adults. He completed his Bachelor’s degree in psychology at Virginia Tech in 2002 and his Master’s degree in Psychological Sciences from James Madison University in 2005. He then moved to Detroit where he completed the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology at Wayne State University. His graduate training was supported in part through an NIH T-32 award in Aging and Urban Health at the Institute of Gerontology. He went on to complete the clinical neuropsychology pre-doctoral internship program at the Medical University of South Carolina before moving to Orlando. As a faculty member at UCF, Dr. Paulson teaches in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program and directs the Orlando Later-Life Developmental Research Lab (OLDeR Lab) where his research focuses on both dementia caregiving and late-life depression.