Registration now open – Multiple System Atrophy Conference, Sept 28-29

Registration is now open for the Multiple System Atrophy Conference!  The conference is co-hosted by the MSA Coalition and Stanford University.  Brain Support Network will be exhibiting, providing volunteers, and speaking on the topic of brain donation.

When:
Friday, September 28th, 10am-9pm
Saturday, September 29th, 8:30am-5pm

Where:
Hyatt SFO (in Burlingame, just off Highway 101)

Cost:
Free

Below, I’ve copied the agenda that the Coalition posted to its website.  Friday’s talks will focus on practical information for living with MSA, support services, and therapies. There’s a reception and dinner on Friday.

And Saturday’s talks will feature Stanford’s Kathleen Poston, MD,
movement disorders specialist, and Mitchell Miglis, MD, autonomic
disorders specialist. Other physicians from Stanford and various Bay
Area clinics will address topics of sleep, urology, bowel dysfunction,
etc. Researchers from around the US will give updates on the latest
MSA research.

The agenda doesn’t say but I believe registration opens around 9am on
Friday. The conference runs from 10am to 9pm on Friday. Registration
opens at 8am on Saturday. The conference runs from 8:30am to 5pm on
Saturday.

Register here

I don’t see a deadline for registration but I would think it’s several days before September 28th.

The Hyatt Reservations number is 800-233-1234.  The MSA Coalition’s room rate is $216/night.  A limited number of ADA rooms are available.

Robin

————————-

You can find the tentative conference agenda here:
(scroll down about half way)

Friday, September 28, 2018

[We are assuming registration begins around 9 a.m.]

10 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Welcome by Stanford University Hosts and MSA
Coalition Board Chair

10:15 a.m. -11:00 a.m. Overview – MSA & Research 101 – Dr. Kathleen Poston

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Support Group Meetings

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Afternoon Workshop Sessions

There will be multiple time slots with two or three sessions per time
slot and selected sessions will be repeated. Topics will ranch from
practical information for living with MSA, support services,
therapeutic approaches to address symptoms, and research information
and participation opportunities.

5:15 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Reception

6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Dinner Program

Saturday, September 29, 2018

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Registration & Breakfast

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. Welcome by Stanford University Hosts and MSA
Coalition Board Chair

8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Symptoms & Treatment Management

Movement Disorder Issues – Dr. Kathleen Poston
Autonomic Issues – Dr. Safwan Jaradeh and Dr. Mitchell Miglis
Sleep Issues- Dr. Mitchell Miglis and Dr. Michelle Cao

9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Medical Q & A

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Break/Activity

10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Interdisciplinary Panel – Dr. Kathleen Poston
will facilitate a panel discussion among medical specialists in areas
such as urology, gastroenterology, and cardiology with specific
respect to MSA.

11:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Panel Q & A

12:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Lunch & Exhibits

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. MSA Research

Natural History Study & Update from 6th International MSA Congress
-Dr. Mitchell Miglis & Dr. Lucy Norcliffe-Kaufmann
Clinical Trials & Relevant Studies– Dr. Daniel Claassen
Research Highlights & Future Directions – Dr. Vik Khurana

3:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. Break/Activity

3:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Research Q & A

3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Closing Remarks

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Support Group Meetings

Cancelled – “What If It’s NOT Parkinson’s?” Webinar on Tuesday, June 12th

Update on 6/11/18:  Unfortunately this webinar is now cancelled.

Brain Support Network group member Steven Russell shared with me today info on an upcoming webinar, which will give an overview of all four of the atypical parkinsonism disorders — MSA, LBD, PSP, and CBD.  Details are:

What If It’s NOT Parkinson’s?

In this webinar, Dr. Mihaela Alexander, Colorado Neurodiagnostics, will discuss atypical parkinsonisms such as multiple system atrophy and Lewy body dementia, among others (PSP, CBD). Dr. Alexander will cover what we know about these conditions and what treatments are available for each condition.

Tuesday, June 12
10-11am CA time

Organizer:
Parkinson Association of the Rockies, Denver, parkinsonrockies.org

Registration:
attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3367947443153312002

General Information:  (same as what is above)
parkinsonrockies.org/programs-services/event-calendar/276/2018-06-12/what-if-it-s-not-parkinson-s-webinar

 

Highlights from International Congress on Multiple System Atrophy

The International Multiple System Atrophy conference was held in early
March 2018 in New York City. In late April, an article describing the
highlights of the conference was published by NYU’s Dysautonomia
Center. Check it out….

dysautonomiacenter.com/2018/04/24/progress-in-a-rare-disease-highlights-from-the-6th-international-congress-on-multiple-system-atrophy/

Robin

 

Jackie’s example of a letter to family/friends to help them communicate better

On Tuesday, Jackie Vandenberg, who lives in NY with multiple system atrophy, asked people to share her open letter to family and friends.  The goal of her letter is to help family and friends communicate with her better.  I think it’s worth sharing with everyone as it is not MSA-specific but person-specific.  Others may want to use this open letter as a model for their own letter to aide in communicating with your family and friends.


Dear friends and family,

I always appreciate when friends and family come to visit. I noticed
lately that some people struggle knowing how to talk with me as my
ability to communicate decreases. I have brainstormed a few things to help…

1) I enjoy socializing even though I cannot speak back. I’m interested
and am listening when others tell me about themselves. I like to hear
about how people are doing, their families, hobbies, vacations,
experiences, weekend activities, etc.

2) I wish to be spoken to as a person and an adult. Please speak to me
normally by not using slower or louder speech, or a reduced vocabulary
and sentence structures. I like to be part of the conversation by making
eye contact and being spoken to directly.

3) It’s easier/quicker for me to be asked ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions.

4) When we’re together you can talk or not talk, either is fine. I’m
comfortable with quiet too.

5) I use a piece of cardboard with the alphabet written out to
communicate, we call it a Ouija Board. I can point to letters to spell
out words. I need someone else to hold the cardboard and adjust it as I
go. It can take a while for me to spell out sentences so I appreciate
everyone’s patience. It’s ok if you don’t understand a word the first
few times, as Tom and Adrianne can attest to.

6) When I’m using the Dynavox communication device it’s ok to fix
letters/autocorrect for me.

7) A symptom of MSA is excessive drooling. If you’re comfortable doing
so you can use a tissue or washcloth to wipe my mouth.

8) The best way to contact me to make plans is on Tom’s cell phone
through call or text. I check my email and Facebook messenger every
couple of days and am happy to get messages there too.

I hope this list is helpful for everyone! I love having friends and
family visit and appreciate all of our time together.

With Love,
Jackie

SHARE program available to some caregivers in the Bay Area

This blog post will be of interest to those living in the San Francisco Bay Area, who are caring for those age 60 or older without dementia.

Northern California-based Family Caregiver Alliance (caregiver.org) is
organizing a free educational program called SHARE.

Within Brain Support Network, three types of caregivers are eligible —
* PSP caregivers not dealing with dementia
* CBD caregivers not dealing with dementia
* all MSA caregivers

The care receiver (person with a neurological diagnosis) must:
–  Be over age 60
–  Be living at home in the San Francisco Bay Area
–  Have intact cognitive abilities – NO dementia
–  Not be in the terminal stage of their disease

The caregiver will receive:
–  6 in-person home visits
–  Learn effective communication skills
–  Learn to reduce stress
–  Learn to promote health
–  Learn about long-term care management (make the most out of today
while planning for tomorrow)

If this is of interest, contact Michelle Venegas (415-434-3388, x323,

[email protected]) at Family Caregiver Alliance.

2017 Accomplishments and Year-End Challenge Grant (for contributions by Dec. 31st!)

As 2017 ticks down, we hope you enjoy some quality-time with family and friends. We wanted to share our results for 2017. Plus, this is a great time to make a charitable contribution as other generous donors are doubling your contribution.

UPDATE

Brain Support Network (BSN) continues to pursue its three missions:
(1) create and disseminate information on LBD, PSP, MSA, and CBD to members (You are one of 450 Northern Californians on our network’s email list.)
(2) coordinate the local caregiver support group in San Mateo
(3) help any family with brain donation.

We (BSN volunteers and part-time employees) have kept busy in 2017:

UPDATE

Brain Support Network (BSN) continues to pursue its three missions:

(1) create and disseminate information on LBD, PSP, MSA, and CBD to members

(2) help any family with brain donation

(3) coordinate the local caregiver support group in Northern California

We (BSN volunteers and part-time employees) have kept busy in 2017:

* We sent out over 250 email updates, most of which focused on one of four specific disorders: LBD (Lewy body dementia), PSP (progressive supranuclear palsy), MSA (multiple system atrophy), and CBD (corticobasal degeneration). Many emails relate to caregiving and dementia caregiving.

* We published over 600 Facebook posts on similar subjects (because some people prefer Facebook).

* We served as a clearinghouse of information and support for network members.

* We have kept our web site relevant and up to date (e.g. our “Top Resources” lists for the four primary disorders and our blog).

* We organized 94 brain donations (a new record for BSN), most of which were delivered to the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville. (Of course the year isn’t quite finished.)

* We hosted our largest-ever “Research Update and Practical Conference on PSP/CBD” in cooperation with the UCSF Memory and Aging Center on October 28, 2017, in San Mateo. Conference video and handouts are available.

CHALLENGE GRANT

This is the time of year when we ask you for assistance.

Five long-time support group members and two long-time BSN benefactors have offered a “challenge grant” to network members. Your charitable contributions through December 31st will be matched up to $8,000. Please help us take advantage of this opportunity and help make possible our efforts for the coming year.

If you mail a check, please write “match” on the memo line along with the name of the family member or friend that you are honoring or remembering. Or, enclose a note with that information. Make checks payable to “Brain Support Network,” and mail to BSN, PO Box 7264, Menlo Park, CA 94026. To count towards the challenge donation, checks should be dated and postmarked by December 31, 2017, Your check does *not* need to be received by this date.

If you make an online contribution (via credit card), please write the name of your family member/friend after selecting “in honor of” or “in memory of.” Please append “/Match” to the name of the person. To count towards the challenge donation, online contributions should be completed by Sunday, December 31, at 11:59pm California time.

Brain Support Network is recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt charity and your donations are deductible to the extent allowed by law. Please know that any amount—$25, $50, $100, $250, $500, or more—is appreciated! Thank you for supporting our three missions!

Happy 2018 to you and your families!

Take care,
Robin (volunteer)
Brain Support Network CEO

“Cognitive Impairment in Multi-System Atrophy: Is It Time to Update Diagnostic Criteria?”

This is a good summary article from Neurology Advisor (neurologyadvisor.com) in mid-November 2017 about cognitive impairment in multiple system atrophy (MSA).  Here’s a link to the full article:

www.neurologyadvisor.com/movement-disorders/multiple-system-atrophy-cognitive-impairment-diagnosis/article/707494/

This was the most interesting excerpt to me:

A 2014 position paper published in Movement Disorders by the MODIMSA Study Group observed that the shorter survival associated with MSA may mask a potentially higher rate of cognitive decline, as the incidence of CI in patients who live longer than 8 years is nearly 50%. “If the disease did not have such a rapid course, the cumulative prevalence of dementia in MSA would be similar to that of Parkinson disease,” they wrote.

The full article is worth reading!

Robin

“Across the Spectrum: PD and Other Movement Disorders” (LBD, MSA, and PSP) – Notes

This webinar from the Michael J. Fox Foundation from 2014 gives a very broad overview of several movement disorders *besides* Parkinson’s Disease (PD).  Much of the webinar focuses on Lewy body dementia (LBD) though there is some discussion of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and a bit of discussion of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) — as these three diseases are often confused for each other and for Parkinson’s.  And the webinar includes a terrific discussion with two physicians about research into these disorders.

Dave Iverson is the host of the hour-long webinar.  There are three speakers:
* Alexander, who has a diagnosis Lewy body dementia
* Dr. David Standaert, movement disorder specialist
* Dr. Susan Bressman, neurologistThere was only one slide for the talk, which is:

What do Movement Disorders Look Like?
* Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS) – Gradual loss of muscle control, muscles atrophy
* Dystonia – Muscle spasms and contractions; repetitive, twisting movements
* Essential Tremor – Rhythmic shaking, most often in hands; most common movement disorder
* Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) – Cognitive impairment; hallucinations; spontaneous parkinsonism
* Multiple Sclerosis (MS) – Vision difficulties; balance problems; numbness and muscle weakness; thinking and memory problems
* Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) – Parkinson’s-like motor symptoms; more severe autonomic dysfunction
* Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) – Gait and balance problems; inability to focus eyes; cognitive impairment

Here’s a link to the recording:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=v27n19kx4gA&list=PLkPIhQnN7cN6dAJZ5K5zQzY84btUTLo_C&index=11

Across the Spectrum: Parkinson’s and other Movement Disorders
Michael J. Fox Foundation Webinar
March 20, 2014

Brain Support Network uber-volunteer Denise Dagan recently listened to the recording and shared notes below.

Robin

———————————–
Notes by Denise Dagan, Brain Support Network VolunteerAcross the Spectrum: Parkinson’s and other Movement Disorders
Michael J. Fox Foundation Webinar

March 20, 2014

LEWY BODY DEMENTIA

Alexander explained that he went 20 years before getting an accurate diagnosis of LBD.  One symptom was significant fatigue, misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.  Another was losing his sense of smell.  10-15 years into these strange symptoms was REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, which has since been closely linked to LBD, but at the time was not.  Now, these things are considered early warning signs of PD, but at the time doctors didn’t suspect because he still doesn’t have any significant motor or gait symptoms.  He was misdiagnosed with Alzheimer’s even in the presence of hallucination and perceptual symptoms.  Only when he did his own research was he convinced he did not have Alzheimer’s, but LBD.  He discovered a neurologist as a forerunner in the field of LBD and flew to him to confirm that diagnosis.  At the time he was surprised at the ignorance of neurologists about LBD.  He has since found they are most curious to learn about it.

Alexander is working on a humorous monologue called “Braking for Alligators.”  He hallucinated, and braked for, an alligator in Massachusetts.  He believes humor is very powerful in taking some of the weight off the experience of having such a serious diagnosis with disturbing symptoms, like hallucinations.  Humor is something he can still offer others.

Dr. David Standaert is not surprised that 20 years ago doctors didn’t use the term LBD.  The name was coined in the late 1980s and even in the early 90s they knew very little about it.  It would have been called atypical Alzheimer’s or atypical dementia until the late 90s when they were able to find Lewy bodies in the brain and understand their significance in this neurodenegerative disorder.

Lewy bodies are an abnormal structure found in the dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease.  In the late 90s, researchers discovered the protein alpha synuclein, which is a major component of Lewy bodies.  That opened the door in looking across the brain.  Researchers discovered that those people who had dementia and other associated symptoms Alexander described (including hallucinations) had these Lewy bodies all over the brain.  These Lewy bodies are hard to see unless you stain for alpha synuclein, then they are obvious.  LBD doesn’t typically have forgetfulness, like Alzheimer’s.

Dr. Susan Bressman says the abnormally mis-folded, or clumping proteins are a common phenomenon of other neurodegenerative disorders (MSA, PSP), as well.

Dr. Standaert believes that they will ultimately find that Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and LBD are the same condition (the basic disease process is the same in these two disorders) manifesting in different ways.  Dr. Bressman agrees.

Alexander has participated in research at the Mayo Clinic.  The DAT scan shows the dopamine deficit even though he doesn’t have typical movement symptoms.  Dr. Bressman suggests the area of the brain affected determines what symptoms manifest so Alexander has RBD, loss of smell, hallucinations (pre-motor features).  Alexander does take some Neupro, which, at a higher dose, worsened his hallucinations.  He still takes a low dose.

MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY

Dr. Bressman says MSA can be clinically difficult to distinguish from PD.  One form has a cerebellar effect with more unsteadiness and uncoordination symptoms.  There is also a Parkinson’s form with really does mimic Parkinson’s.  What helps distinguish it from PD are problems with autonomic issues like bladder and blood pressure control very early in the progression of the disease.  It can take years to feel confident which diagnosis is correct.  There is a lot of overlap in the pathology, but in MSA, instead of the neurons, alpha synuclein pathology is in the glia supporting cell.  The glia cells in the brain have inclusions.  Treatment overlaps as well.

Dr. Standaert agrees with Dr. Bressman.  There’s no test to distinguish between MSA and PD during life.  People are working on one.  As a neurologist follows a patient over years symptoms become more distinct, like when motor symptoms do not respond well to PD medications, and when there are a lot of early autonomic symptoms.  In MSA there are very few cognitive problems.  Under a microscope, you would not mistake MSA for PD.  It is still alpha synuclein, but it is in the glia in MSA rather than in the neurons in PD.

There is some loss of dopamine function in MSA because the Parkinsonian form does damage the substantial nigra, but the appearance on the DAT scan is somewhat different because in MSA you can see the damage is still somewhat even, whereas in PD the damage is asymmetric.  So, the DAT scan can give you a clue, but it is not a definitive test to separate the two.

Dr. Bressman says there are papers suggesting an MRI can help to distinguish between the two, but there is a lot of debate about that.  Doctors will sometimes send patients for a glucose PET scan to use the glucose metabolic pattern to distinguish between typical Parkinson’s and more of an atypical parkinsonism of some sort.  The definitive diagnostic method is really to follow patients over time and watch the manifestation of symptoms, responsiveness to medications, and putting all the pieces together.

QUESTION AND ANSWER

Dave Iverson asked the doctors what can be learned about one of these neurodegenerative disorders as we learn about another of them.  Dr. Standaert says they are all age-associated diseases.  While young people do, occasionally, develop neurodegenerative diseases they develop after age 50, 60, 70 and beyond so age is a trigger.  They are all also associated with the development of abnormal proteins.  Each disorder is a different protein (misfolding protein), but at the core there are important commonalities.

Dave Iverson asked if there is an important reason to pursue the right diagnosis.  Dr. Bressman says patients really want to know what it is.  Knowledge is power, and getting the right diagnosis can affect getting the right treatment.  When you get to MSA, PSP, CBD at this point the treatment are empiric for the most part.  It is important in terms of prognosis, family counseling, clinical trials, and ultimately for targeted treatments, when those become available.  We think of PD as being a homogenous entity, but there are subtypes, early onset, those with more or less gait disorder.  So, on the one hand we lump them together, and on the other hand we want to customize treatment to each individual’s greatest difficulties.

Dave Iverson asks if essential tremor can progress to PD.  Dr. Standaert says sometimes doctors will diagnose essential tremor (often symmetrical, runs in families, and is bilateral, so not PD) and the patient will return with real PD symptoms.  People with essential tremor tend to be diagnosed with PD more frequently with PD than the general population.  They thought this was due to misdiagnosis as essential tremor when it is incipient PD.  DAT scan can help with this teasing out between these two conditions.  Dr. Bressman totally agrees.  This lingering question of whether essential tremor increases risk of developing PD, or is essential so common some percentage will go on to develop PD in the same numbers of the general population, or are some number of those diagnosed with PD misdiagnosed until the PD symptoms become obvious.  That’s why we have the DAT scan.  That’s what it is FDA approved for, to distinguish between these conditions.  Dr. Standaert says if there is a mechanistic or genetic connection between essential tremor and PD, they haven’t discovered it, yet.

Dave Iverson asked if it is unusual for someone to have PD and then ALS, for example.  Dr. Bressman says it is an unlikely but now that we have different genetic subtypes, looking at ALS through a genetics lens, it is a heterogeneous disorder and some people who have motor-neuron disorder can have parkinsonism or a PSP-like picture.  So, the motor neuron picture is getting more complicated as we’re understanding the genetics.  She has had patients with motor-neuron disease and parkinsonism who have turned out to have one of these genetic subtypes.  It’s rare.  They are separate disorders but in some subtypes you can have the two together.

Dave Iverson asked if the LRRK2 mutation that causes the most common genetic form of PD can also lead to other movement disorders.  Dr. Standaert says in families where the original LRRK2 gene was discovered as a cause of PD (2-4% of cases in the US) some individuals had MSA or PSP (tau) -looking pathology.  So there were other forms of neurodegenerative disease in those families.  This indicates LRRK2 can not only trigger PD, but other forms of neurodegenerative diseases.  Researchers wonder about LRRK2 — does something happen far upstream, modulating the response of the brain to these mis-folded proteins, perhaps modulating the inflammatory response that follows them.  So, is it a general kind of gene that can enable a number of different pathologies?

Dr. Bressman has been looking for gene carriers that have these other neurodegenerative disorders or other phenotypes, but hasn’t found that so far.   Family members who are gene carriers are either normal (healthy) or have PD, although it is classic PD.  There is more of a gait/balance issue than a tremor.  Some have a classic rest tremor.  They haven’t identified motor-neuron disease or PSP or other neurologic pictures in these families.  Only 28-35% of people who have this gene will develop PD before age 80.  This seems to lead to a connection between a link between the gene and some upstream event, or some sort of exposure to lead to PD.

Dr. Standaert says most disease process are a combination between genetics and environment.  We just don’t understand this enough in PD.

Dave Iverson asked Alexander if he has autonomic symptoms (bladder, constipation, blood pressure, etc.).  Alexander says yes, he didn’t realize that they were associated to his illness until the doctor confirming LBD started asking him about some autonomic issues, specifically.  Then he knew all his symptoms were related.

Dave Iverson asked Dr. Bressman if these autonomic symptoms cut across all these disorders?  She says certainly PD and MSA and can be the most debilitating feature (like low blood pressure, and bladder issues).

Alexander comments (and the doctors both agree) that proper diagnosis is important, especially for those with LBD, because word needs to get out to doctors, patients and families to prevent patients being given neuroleptics (such as Haldol) which are powerful blockers of the dopamine receptors in the brain.  These types of drugs are used widely in medicine when someone has hallucinations (common in LBD).  If you give this to someone with LBD, even though they may not have symptoms that manifest as parkinsonian/movement related, they can become rigid and stiff for weeks.

Dave Iverson asked what is the difference in prognosis between these different disorders.  Alexander says his doctor says, in his experience, the rate at which the initial condition unfolds is similar to the rate at which it further progresses.  If symptoms come on gradually, it is likely to continue to progress just as slowly and is unlikely to make sharp downturns.  That is good news for him as his took so long to diagnose.

Dr. Standaert agrees, although no two cases are exactly the same.  The pace of one’s disease progression doesn’t change a lot over time.  These neurodegenerative disorders progress at different rates from each other, ALS tends to progress much more rapidly than others.

Dr. Bressman agrees.  There is no crystal ball because something new can happen as one ages.

Dave Iverson asked Dr. Bressman to talk about dystonia.  She says dystonia is on the list separately because a not insignificant percentage of PD, particularly with early onset, can be caused by the disease itself or medication induced.  How you treat it depends on what you think is the cause (peak dose, end of dose, early morning) so you may adjust the timing, Amantadine, or Entacapone.  Ultimately, the best treatment will be better dopaminergic meds, DBS or a cure.

Dave Iverson asked if exercise helps in all of these disorders as it does for PD.  Dr. Standaert thinks exercise is helpful in all of them, but in PSP there is a tremendous issue with balance and falling.  MS is worsened by overheating, so be careful with that.  Apply the right kind of exercise for safety to each disorder.  Alexander says he only recently realized exercise is helpful for him.

Dave Iverson asked if there is a connection in both MS and ALS.  Dr. Standaert says both have abnormal proteins, but the part of the brain attacked is different.  MS is quite different as it is an immune attack upon the brain, but the commonality is the recent recognition of the inflammation response between all these disorders.  Otherwise, the cause, diagnosis, and management is quite different.

Dave Iverson asks about the more drastic drop in blood pressure between in MSA than in PD.  Dr. Bressman says that is true.  The treatments are very similar, but too many patients don’t talk about it.  If they are feeling faint they should tell their doctor and have regular blood pressure checks to discuss how to manage it.  Its dangerous because it can lead to falling, but there are a lot of treatment options.  Some people are even still on old blood pressure meds to lower blood pressure from cardiologists prior to adding a neurodegenerative disorder, and those aren’t needed anymore.

Dave Iverson asks Dr. Bressman if she is hopeful that connections between research will lead to treatments across all these disorders.  She is quite hopeful and the research is broad and applicable to not only insight into PD, but other disorders with respect to the search for a cure or better uses of the treatments they already have.

Dave Iverson asks Dr. Standaert if he things that is encouraging for pharmaceutical companies.  He says the more they learn about these diseases the more they realized there are shared commonalities of attack to research treatments.  Success in one will really open the door to success in others.  The rare disorders may not get the funding for research, but will benefit from those getting funding.  PD may not be just one condition because there are more than one gene that can trigger it, and a multitude of symptoms.  Dr. Bressman says one type of ALS may share a treatment option with some type of PD.

Dave Iverson asks Alexander to close the conversation.  Alexander says he has found with respect to his hallucinations is to use them as creative prompts for writing poetry and other creative works.  That is always potentially possible and there is more attention to this in the dementia care community.