Recording, Resources + Notes from Orthostatic Hypotension in PD, MSA, and LBD Webinar

Brain Support Network and Stanford University co-hosted a webinar last Monday, September 18th about orthostatic hypotension (OH) in Parkinson’s Disease (PD), Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD).

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RECORDING

We’ve posted the webinar recording here —

https://youtu.be/-FzsgUfQ_xI

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SURVEY

If you listen to the webinar recording, please take LESS THAN FIVE MINUTES to answer six questions on our survey.  See:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QGHVV85

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RESOURCES

For additional information on the topics addressed during the webinar, see:

Orthostatic hypotension –
parkinsons.stanford.edu/orthostatic_hypotension.html

Parkinson’s – parkinsons.stanford.edu

Make an appointment with Dr. Santini at the Stanford Movement Disorders Center –  650-723-6469

Multiple System Atrophy www.brainsupportnetwork.org/msa

Lewy Body Dementia www.brainsupportnetwork.org/lbd

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NOTES

Our terrific volunteer, Denise Dagan, took notes from the webinar.

Webinar
Orthostatic Hypotension (OH) in Parkinson’s, Multiple System Atrophy, and Lewy Body Dementia

Speaker:  Veronica Santini, MD, movement disorders specialist, Stanford University
Host: Candy Welch, former MSA caregiver, Brain Support Network
September 18, 2017

 

SANTINI’S PRESENTATION

Topics for this webinar are:
* Describe symptoms associated with orthostatic hypotension (OH) in
– Parkinson’s Disease (PD)
– Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)
– Lewy Body Dementia (LBD)
* List the conservative and medication interventions used for treatment

Normal Blood Pressure Response to Gravitational Change
Gravitational Change = changing from lying or sitting to standing, even climbing stairs.  Gravity pulls blood into the legs and belly (up to 1 liter, or more).  That means less blood goes to the heart, resulting in up to 20% less blood leaving the heart and consequent blood pressure decrease.  Normally sensors in the neck see less blood pressure and sends signals to close blood vessels, increasing blood pressure.  Important organs get nutrients and oxygen.

In OH the sensors are not working properly (baroreceptor reflex is dysfunctional), so blood vessels don’t close.  They stay open and blood pressure drops, causing symptoms.

Common symptoms include:  lightheadedness, dizziness, almost passing out, weakness, fatigue, visual blurring, headaches.

Less common are:  buckling legs, walking difficulties, confusion, slowed thinking, shortness of breath, imbalance, jerking movements, neck pain/“coat hanger headache”, chest pain

Rare symptoms include:  stroke-like symptoms, weakness or numbness, abnormal cramping/dystonia.

Evaluation of OH includes:
– History of autonomic symptoms
– “Orthostatic” blood pressure (BP) = measure BP in both laying and standing postures.  OH is defined as a drop of the systolic >20 or diastolic >10
– Neurological examination
– Autonomic testing can be helpful in distinguishing PD/DLB from MSA

Approach to Treatment of OH:
Conservative therapy first, then adding Medications and, if necessary, Combination therapies (both conservative and medications, even a combination of medications)

Goals of Treatment:
1. Prevent loss of consciousness (this leads to falls and potential injury)
2. Prevent close calls (almost losing consciousness and)
3. Identify and prevent symptoms of OH (leg weakness, falls, somnolence, confusion)
4. Improve fatigue, exercise tollerance and cognition

Actions to Avoid:
– Standing motionless
– Standing too quickly
– Working with arms above shoulders
– Hot environments (anything that leads to sweating)
– High altitude
– Hot baths
– Fever
– Dehydration !!!
– Vigorous exercise
– Fast or heavy breathing
– Large meals
– Alcohol
– Straining with urination or defecation
– Coughing spells

Conservative Management:
– Water ingestion (60oz/day!)
– Salt tabs, dietary salt (chips, pretzels, nuts, deli meats, soups, tomato juice)
– Head of bed elevation 10-20 degrees/4” or 10cm (reduces postural change extremes, and urination)
– Physical maneuvers that raise orthostatic blood pressure (standing calf exertion, raise one leg on a step, knee bends, single knee kneel)
– Cooling vests, leg sleeves, binders around the abdomen after eating to prevent blood rushing to gut for digestion

Medications:
Fludrocortisone (Florinef)
Mineralocorticoid, a-1 agonist = woirks by expanding blood vessel volumes
Dose 0.1-0.5mg/daily
Should be used carefully due to rise of volume overload, electrolyte abnormalities
Additional side effects: headache, swelling, weight gain, high blood pressure lying flat.

Midrodrine
Peripheral z1 agonist = Works by squeezing blood vessels
Dose 5-10mg 3x daily
Common side effects: pupil dilation, goose flesh, tingling, itching
Can also cause high blood pressures when lying flat.

Droxidopa (Northera) (Newest FDA-approved Rx)
Norepinephrine (NE) pro-drug but the exact mechanism of action is unknown.
Studies have shown low standing NE
Dose 100-600mg 3x daily
Common side effects: headaches, dizziness, nausea, blurry vision, high blood pressure
Can also cause high blood pressures when lying flat.

Doctors advise against lying down when using all of these so you don’t raise blood pressure too high. Never take them before bedtime so blood pressure doesn’t go to high while sleeping.

Non FDA-approved Pharmacology:
Pyridostigmine (Mestinon)
Improves standing BP in patients w/OH
Does not increase BP when lying down
Effective alone or w/Midrodrine
Side effects: diarrhea, salivation, nausea, vomiting, muscle cramps, twitching\

Yohimbine
a-2 adrenorectptor antagonist = increases norepinephrine and BP
Side effects: confusion, increase in heart rate, headache, or tremor
Medication interactions
Regulation of supplements

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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS  (all answers are by Dr. Santini, unless indicated)

Q:  What can caregivers do to help?

A:  Be the squeaky wheel by reminding your family member to keep hydrated, eat salty foods (even it that means the two of you eat different meals), help them check blood pressure throughout the day.  Also, give your doctor a symptom report so he/she has a full picture of challenges at home.  Doctors can’t fix what they don’t know about.  Sometimes patients get used to having low BP, so they don’t report changes to their doctor.  Caregivers can be more objective in how things used to be before BP issues arose, like seeing increased falls, more sleepiness, etc.  Caregivers need the right amount of support, as well.  Sometimes, the doctor can arrange for a nursing assistant to come into the home to do BP checks, or provide other services.  Just let your neurologist know if you are feeling the least bit overwhelmed.

Q:  How do you keep someone safe with OH without confining them to a wheelchair?

A:  Doctors should make sure the patient’s BP is good enough to have a full and active life.  It is a step-wise process, so be patient, but patients and their families or caregivers should be persistent.  Make sure all aspects of the patient’s health influencing BP is investigated, the big picture is formed and all therapies possible are attempted.

Candy:  We had a tilting wheelchair for my husband, who had MSA, so when he was feeling faint they could tilt the chair back making it easier for the body to maintain blood pressure, and preventing him from feeling awful or passing out.

Dr. Santini:  Neurologists are often able to write a letter to your insurance company recommending such a chair so that it is covered by insurance.  They are very expensive, but insurance did pay for Candy’s husband’s tilting wheelchair.

Q:  How does blood pressure affect brain function?

A:  There are several philosophies, but it is thought the blood carrying oxygen and nutrients doesn’t get to certain parts of the brain when BP is low.  The most upper parts of the brain affect both thinking and leg function.  Lack of oxygen and nutrients to these parts of the brain can cause all the symptoms mentioned; visual blurring, headaches, neck pain, dizziness, etc.

Q:  Are there any new blood pressure (BP) treatments?

A:  Yes, the newest is Northera.  Anecdotal evidence shows it to be quite effective.  But, the old ones are tried and true and new ones can be significantly more expensive.

Q: How do BP medications interact with Parkinson’s medications?

A:   There are several issues here.  Parkinson’s disease and atypical parkinsonian syndromes, like Lewy Body Dementia and Multiple System Atrophy cause problems with orthostatic hypotension.  So, the disease itself causes OH problems.  Almost every medicine doctors have to treat parkinsonian syndromes also drop blood pressure, unfortunately.  Patients should understand they need not suffer.  Let your physician boost your BP with some meds, then get your PD symptoms under control with other meds.  It is more meds, but if it improves your quality of life because you can move better and you can think and not be dizzy, etc. it’s probably worth it.  I frequently see patients who are not taking enough carbidopa-levodopa because it lowers BP.  I boost the BP, then add enough carbidopa-levodopa to improve mobility.  It’s a trade-off, but I feel quality of life is the most important thing while the patient is well enough in other ways to be active without feeling dizzy.

Q:   Can beta blockers help?

A:   With beta blockers you have to be careful. Beta blockers are often used for tremor control. We use those that don’t affect BP too much. They can be helpful for people who have very elevated heart rates.  Usually, the best treatment is to use the BP boosting agents. Oftentimes, in the absence of Northera, which can sometimes cause an increased heart rate, if you treat BP, heart rate can come down.

Q: What foods and supplements are best for OH?  Anything to be avoided?

A: It’s more how often you’re eating and how much you’re eating.  The bigger the meal, the more your BP can drop afterward.  If you are susceptible to BP drops after meals, an abdominal binder can be helpful.  Put it on about 10 minutes before a meal and keep it on for an hour afterward.  I recommend several small meals throughout the day, rather than three big meals. As far as what meals are best, we know some people have more difficulty with digestion of gluten or lactose.  Try going gluten free first for a couple weeks to see if it makes a difference for you.  If not, return the gluten and try going lactose free for a couple weeks.  It’s a good test to see if you are one of those with these digestive issues.

Q: What do you do if you have both OH and hypertension?

A: This is by far the most challenging of the group.  You have to decide on goals of care. Most commonly, people have hypertension, or high blood pressure, when they are lying flat. In that case you should avoid that flat position during the day.  At night we sometimes give a short-acting high blood pressure medicine, something like captopril, clonodine, etc.  It is more challenging when people have wide swings in BP.  It is extremely common in MSA and advanced PD.  Even standing or sitting people will have very high blood pressures, with systolic in the 180s of 190s.  Others will have extremely low blood pressures standing, with systolic in the 70s of 80s and they are passing out.  One thing doctors will do is ask patients to take their BP before they take the BP boosting medicine.  Then, the doctor will advise against taking the BP boosting meds when BP is already high, but to take it later in the day.  Sometimes, a person will need to avoid everything causing high BP.  Sometimes not treating high BP is the best option, even though that would normally not be recommended.  You have to treat which is causing the most symptoms and affecting quality of life.

Q: Can salt tablets help?

A: Yes, if you don’t like eating salt.  Talk with your doctor.  Taking a 1 gram tablet of salt in a tablet works better for some people than having salty meals.

Q: Can OH cause shortness of breath?

A: Yes!  It’s a common symptom because the upper lungs aren’t seeing as much blood as they usually do when BP is normal.  Gravity is pulling the blood down and those upper lung fields feel like they’re not breathing so people feel short of breath.

Q: Why does BP drop with exercise?

A: Sometimes it will raise, sometimes it will drop.  You may notice basketball players wearing sleeves on their ankles and legs.  Those are compression sleeves to help adjust BP.  When we exercise, the blood vessels open up so all the blood flow can get to those muscles that are working so hard.  The problem is that in OH we don’t have those extra reflexes to boost the BP back up.  Sometimes vigorous exercise can drop BP in people who have OH.  Those leg and arm sleeves can be very helpful in that case.

Q: Can OH lead to sudden death?

A:   It is a more rare circumstance.  It can certainly lead to heard dysfunction, and that could lead to sudden death.  We know that in autonomic dysfunction people can also have arrhythmias, and that can lead to sudden death.  If not exactly OH, sometimes it’s the autonomic failure that involves the heart that can lead to sudden death.

Q: Is OH more severe in MSA than in PD or LBD?  Is treatment of OH different with these three diseases?

A: Treatment tends to be similar but you have to be ready as the patient, caregiver, and healthcare provider to accept more OH in MSA. OH is typically more severe in MSA than in PD or LBD.  Sometimes very advanced PD or LBD (10+ years) may have severe BP swings, but MSA is more severe because OH occurs early in the disease course.  BP swings/OH is one of the most prominent symptoms people have in the entire MSA disease course.  Treatment goals in MSA may be different from PD and LBD as more accepting of BP swings.

These questions were sent in during the webinar:

Q: Someone has MSA w/OH but also supine hypotension (low blood pressure lying down).

A: This is easiest to treat because you just need to boost BP in all positions (lying down, sitting, and standing).  I would be concerned something else is going on and would recommend autonomic testing to determine that.

Q: Someone has primary autonomic failure (PAF) with possible MSA.  Does OH occur in PAF?

A: Oh, yes!  This whole category of PAF is a difficult one.  There is a current study looking at the natural history of primary autonomic failure.  Based on that research they are finding some of these patients eventually meet qualifications for an PD or MSA diagnosis.  Some people just have PAF, but not significant PD symptoms or progressive parkinsonism.  The main symptoms these patients have is OH and they really suffer from that.

Candy: This is how my husband was diagnosed with MSA.  First, doctors diagnosed PAF.

Q: Northera doesn’t help.  Should I stop and restart it?

A: No.  Sounds like you need to adjust the dosage.  Tell your doctor.  Sometimes, you just need to call or email, rather than make an appointment to see the doctor, for a medication adjustment.  Sometimes, they may ask you to come in in order to understand the problem.  If I had a patient report this to me and the patient was at the max dosage of 600mg/daily, I would cover all the bases with the patient.  I would reassess everything, confirming that the patient is drinking enough water, eating enough salt, wearing compression stockings. Does this patient tolerate Florinef and, if so, can we retry it?   Are you on an effective dose of Florinef or Midodrine, would adding pyridostigmine help the situation? When things get really tough, I sometimes temporarily reduces the anti-Parkinson’s medications (carbidopa-levodopa or dopamine agonist).  Sometimes reducing the PD meds isn’t what’s necessary, but increasing carbidopa can reduce side effects of levodopa, sometimes.  It’s worth looking at.

Q: Can coconut oil help OH?

A: Harmful? probably not, unless you have high cholesterol.  Ask your doctor if you should or should not be eating coconut oil, based on your health numbers.  There is no evidence that it helps.  It’s just the new magic for everything.

Q: Questioner feels faint while having a bowel movement. What can be done?

A: Either urinating or defecating activates the opposite side of the autonomic nervous system, lowering blood pressure.  People have passed out on the toilet.  Bathrooms are dangerous with hard surfaces to hit your head on when passing out.  The answer is to treat the constipation so there is no straining.  Don’t treat to the point of diarrhea because there can be straining with that, as well. Any of these may help:  Miralax, Senna, Cholase, or any stool softener. Another solution may be to put your feet onto a stool so knees are raised while on the toilet (Squatty Potty) can help defecation without straining.  Massage the lower belly while trying to poop can help move your bowel.  Best to poop after a hot meal and around the same time every day.

Q: What about SSRIs (antidepressants) for OH?

A: Yes, Prozac has been studied for use in OH. There is some research that it can help boost BP.

Q: Is Parkinson’s with OH more severe than PD without or a more rapidly progressing form of PD?

A:   Everybody who has PD has a different form of the disease. I have heard the strangest symptoms that a neurologist would consider ‘off medication’ symptoms, or those not normally attributed to PD, but happen to be attributed to that person with PD.  It’s very common for people with PD to have OH.  They are just a little unlucky because with OH you get a lot of symptoms.  Although you feel horrible and like you’re dying, sometimes, it doesn’t mean that your PD is more severe, just because you have those symptoms.  It means it’s something we need to treat and get your quality of life better.

Q: It seems OH research is focused on MSA. Do you feel that is true, and if so, why?

A: Yes, it is very true because patients w/MSA have OH symptoms early and severely in the disease course.  Researchers feel that if they can develop a treatment for OH in MSA, it will help those with PD.  I feel more studies should be done for OH in PD because improvements in OH improves cognition and physical activity for patients with PD.  Up to 30% of newly diagnosed PD patients have OH, so they would benefit from OH research.

Q: If I have severe OH, what kind of doctor should I see?

A: It depends on the specialty at different medical centers.  If you come to see a movement disorder specialist at Stanford, I have had specialized training in treating OH.  But, some movement disorder specialists prefer you see an autonomic specialist if you have OH. Other specialists who can treat OH include cardiologists or nephrologists.  You just have to find the specialist most comfortable in treating OH at the medical center where you are being treated.

Q: Is OH caused by a pathology in the brain?

A: People with MSA, LBD and PD have an abnormal buildup of the protein alpha-synuclein in certain brain cells.  These people can be affected by OH.  Other atypical parkinsonisms, like PSP, CBD, etc. that don’t have alpha-synuclein don’t have OH so we feel there is a connection between OH and alpha-synuclein.

Q: Does Stanford have an autonomic testing center?  Do you know where other autonomic testing centers are located in the US?  What is the benefit of having this testing?

A: Stanford has a very good autonomic testing center.  It is especially useful for people who have diabetes and PD, or in cases where symptoms seem more severe than what would be expected in PD so you would like to gather more information to determine if it is really MSA.  For these people, it may be a good idea to have autonomic testing. Stanford is probably best place for autonomic testing on the west coast.  Mayo Clinic in the midwest, and there are several places on the east coast are terrific, like Beth Israel.

Q: Some research shows that doctors see OH and automatically diagnose MSA.  What’s happening here?

A: I see people newly diagnosed with PD who have some OH and they have been misdiagnosed with MSA.  They actually have PD, but because PD medications lower BP, the medications can make their symptoms look more like MSA early in the course of their symptoms.  When there is a question as to whether someone has PD or MSA, autonomic testing should be done to differentiate between the two.  Seeing a movement disorder specialist rather than just a neurologist because they are specially trained to use set literature criteria that helps to differentiate between these conditions. The history of a person’s initial symptoms helps me figure out an accurate diagnosis.  Also, seeing how a person’s symptoms progress helps to determine an accurate diagnosis.

Q: What does autonomic testing look like?

A: The patient lays flat on a special bed.  There are several tests.  In one they infuse a medication that causes sweating to see how autonomic nervous system responds.  They may also have the patient do deep breathing to see if their heart rate and blood pressure responds correctly.  They also suddenly change the patient’s position from lying to standing (by tipping the table up quickly) to see how heart rate and blood pressure system responds. Depending on the body’s responses to all these different tests, they can determine if they are normal or abnormal.  If there are abnormal responses, it the problem coming from the brain or from the peripheral nervous system. That can be helpful in differentiating between disorders.

Q: What about Methotrexate?

A: That can be used if there is an immune component to the patient’s autonomic dysfunction.

 

Stanford/BSN Webinar – Orthostatic Hypotension in PD, MSA, and LBD, 9/18

Brain Support Network (BSN) is pleased to announce its second webinar with Stanford Movement Disorders Center, one of our Northern California partners.

Update:  See our notes from the webinar here.

Join us for a free, one-hour webinar on orthostatic hypotension in Parkinson’s Disease, multiple system atrophy, and Lewy body dementia. The speaker is Stanford movement disorders specialist Veronica Santini, MD. And the host is long-time BSN MSA group member Candy Welch.  Please spread the word!

What is orthostatic hypotension?  It is the sudden drop in blood pressure upon change in position such as sitting up from lying down in bed or standing up from a seated position.

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Orthostatic Hypotension in Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple System Atrophy, and Lewy Body Dementia

When: Monday, Sept. 18, 2017
2-3pm Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Speaker: Veronica Santini, MD, movement disorders specialist, Stanford Movement Disorders Center

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/32ffda459570534466858a512be5123a

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.  Save that email as it contains an important link with the meeting ID embedded.  You will receive reminders.

Note: If you can’t make it on September 18th, we encourage you to register for the webinar so that you will be alerted when the recording is available online.

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Further details on the webinar topic:

Dr. Veronica Santini, a movement disorder specialist, has extensive experience with orthostatic hypotension in the context of three disorders — Parkinson’s Disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and Lewy body dementia (LBD).

Dr. Santini will address these topics:

  • what is orthostatic hypotension (OH) and how is it diagnosed?
  • is OH different in PD, MSA, and LBD?
  • what are the non-pharmacological treatments?
  • what are the pharmacological treatments?

There will be time for audience questions on OH.

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Further details on the speaker:

The speaker is Dr. Veronica Santini, a movement disorders specialist at Stanford University. Dr. Santini has special interest in the autonomic system.  She takes a holistic approach to patient care and seeks to integrate conservative and alternative therapies where appropriate.

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Further details on the webinar host:

The webinar will be hosted by Candy Welch, whose husband Bob had multiple system atrophy (MSA), confirmed through brain donation. She is on the Board of Brain Support Network, a nonprofit focusing on the four atypical parkinsonism disorders, including multiple system atrophy and Lewy body dementia. Candy will be speaking about brain donation for multiple system atrophy at the national MSA conference in October in Nashville.

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Register in advance for this webinar:

https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/32ffda459570534466858a512be5123a

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Questions? Please contact Robin Riddle.

Carbonated liquids may help swallowing dysfunction (small Swedish study)

This is interesting research from Sweden on the effect of carbonated liquid on swallowing dysfunction. Though the study was done on 48 patients with Lewy body dementia, the findings likely apply to all in the Brain Support Network community.

Two interesting points were made:

1- While 40 patients had swallowing dysfunction confirmed through videofluoroscopy, 14 of these did not perceive they had swallowing symptoms.

2- Out of the patients with swallowing dysfunction, 87% had “an overall improved swallowing function with carbonated liquid.” This was true even that the pharyngeal transit time of carbonated liquid was quicker than think liquid or thickened liquid.

Of course you can test whether carbonated liquids work (for you or for your family member) by requesting they be tried during videofluoroscopy.

The abstract is below.

Robin

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www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28848329

Clinical Interventions in Aging. 2017 Aug 8;12:1215-1222.

Effects of carbonated liquid on swallowing dysfunction in dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia.

Larsson V, Torisson G, Bülow M, Londos E.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
Swallowing dysfunction is an increasingly recognized problem in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD), which can result in aspiration pneumonia and death. Few studies have examined potential ways of improving swallowing function in this fragile patient group. The aim of this study was to evaluate swallowing dysfunction and carbonated liquid using videofluoroscopy in DLB and PDD patients.

METHODS:
A total of 48 patients with DLB and PDD were referred for a clinical examination with videofluoroscopy. Descriptive overall assessments were provided at the time of the examination regarding swallowing function and the effects of different modifications, including carbonated thin liquid (CTL). Additionally, a repeated measures quantitative retrospective analysis has been performed comparing 1) thin liquids; 2) thickened liquids and 3) CTLs, with regard to the quantitative variables 1) pharyngeal transit time (PTT); 2) pharyngeal retention and 3) tracheal penetration.

RESULTS:
In all, 40/48 (83%) of the patients had a swallowing dysfunction, which was confirmed on videofluoroscopy, with 34/40 (85%) patients having a pharyngeal-type dysfunction. A total of 14/40 (35%) patients with an objective swallowing impairment did not have any subjective swallowing symptoms. Out of the patients with swallowing dysfunction, 87% had an overall improved swallowing function with carbonated liquid. PTT for carbonated liquid (median 633 ms, interquartile range [IQR] 516-786 ms) was quicker than for thin liquid (760 ms, IQR 613-940 ms, P=0.014) and thickened liquid (880.0 ms, IQR 600-1,500 ms, P<0.001). No significant effect was seen in residue or penetration.

CONCLUSION:
The majority of patients with DLB or PDD had a swallowing dysfunction, sometimes without subjective swallowing symptoms, which improved with carbonated liquid. This highlights the importance of investigating patients with videofluoroscopy and to carry out a prospective interventional study to further evaluate carbonated liquid, also addressing the effects on quality of life, aspiration and mortality.

Benefits of palliative care, and list of palliative care programs in Northern California

Recently I came across a research article on the emerging role of palliative care in multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The article makes the point that palliative care emphasizes “quality of life in progressive disorders” and is beneficial for all neurodegenerative disorders.

If you’d like to read the full article, check out this link:

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S135380201630400X

Palliative Care and its Emerging Role in Multiple System Atrophy and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
January 2017, volume 34, pages 714

I had a feeling that if I shared this link, many of you would ask “where can I find a palliative care program?” Brain Support Network volunteer Denise Dagan created a list of as many palliative care programs as she could find on the Peninsula and in the South Bay. Since many of these medical clinics exist throughout Northern California — Sutter Health, Kaiser, PAMF, etc — this list should be useful to most of you on this list.

Robin

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PALLIATIVE CARE PROGRAMS ON THE PENINSULA AND IN THE SOUTH BAY
By Denise Dagan (Brain Support Network volunteer)
August 2017

California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC), in San Francisco, is part of Sutter Health. Information about their program can be found here: http://www.cpmc.org/services/palliative.html, or for more information contact Linda Blum, RN, NP, at 415-600-4576.

The Chinese Hospital, San Francisco Call 415-677-2349 for information.

Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula Ask your doctor for more information.

El Camino Hospital, Mountain View Call 650-988-7624 for information or visit https://www.elcaminohospital.org/services/palliative-care

Hospice By the Bay offers palliative care in collaboration with these hospitals:
Marin General, Sonoma Valley, Sonoma Acres and Broadway Villa Sonoma. Call 415-927-2273 for information.

Jewish Family and Children’s Services of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin and Sonoma Counties offers palliative care through Seniors At Home. Call 844-222-3212 or visit the JFCS’ Seniors At Home website.

Kaiser Permanente offers palliative care at several locations around the bay:
Oakland – Inpatient 510-801-7246, Outpatient 510-752-1834
Richmond – Outpatient 510-752-1834
San Francisco – Outpatient 415-833-0204
San Jose – Inpatient 408-972-6888, Outpatient 408-972-7311

Palliative Care


Santa Clara – Inpatient 408-851-7578, Outpatient 408-851-0537,

Palliative Care

Laguna Honda Hospital, San Francisco Call 415-682-1230 for information or to arrange a tour.

Mission Hospice & Home Care, San Mateo, offers in-home palliative care. Call the Clinical Outreach Team 650-554-1000 for information or visit https://www.missionhospice.org/services/transitions/.

Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) offers palliative care in several locations:
Dublin, Fremont, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa Cruz, and Sunnyvale

http://www.pamf.org/palliativecare/locations/

Pathways offers palliative care for any individual or private physician referral on the peninsula, south and east bay areas. Call 844-755-7855 for information.

Regional Medical Center, San Jose Call 877-868-4827 for information

St. Francis Memorial Hospital, San Francisco Call 415-353-6856 or 415-353-6180 for information.

St. Mary’s Medical Center, San Francisco Call 415-750-5907 for information.

San Francisco General Hospital offers inpatient palliative care in Comfort Care Suites. Ask your doctor for more information or visit http://hospital-zsfg.medicine.ucsf.edu/services/palliative.html.

San Mateo Medical Center, San Mateo County Health System Call 650-573-2381 for Information.

Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, San Jose Call 408-793-5974 for information.

Season’s Hospice and Palliative Care offers palliative care in both San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Call 855-812-1136 or email [email protected] for information.

Sequoia Hospital, in Redwood City, offers palliative care through Pathways. Sequoia Hospital is a co-owner of Pathways. Call 888-755-7855 for information.

Stanford offers palliative care in these locations:
Palo Alto – Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. Call 650-497-8963 for information.
Palo Alto – Palliative Care at Stanford Hospital. Call 650-724-0385 for information.
San Jose – Cancer Center South Bay. Call 408-426-4900 for information.

Sutter Health This page has a list of 33 palliative care doctors affiliated with Sutter Health (including, CPMC, Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, PAMF and Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation) in several locations:
Alameda, Auburn, Berkeley, Burlingame, Castro Valley, Fremont, Hayward, Modesto, Oakland, Palo Alto, Roseville, Sacramento, San Francisco, San Jose, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, Sunnyvale, and Yuba City
http://www.sutterhealth.org/findadoctor/northern-california-hospice-and-palliative-medicine-doctors-results.html?Nao=0&recPerPage=100&Nao=0

UCSF Medical Center offers inpatient and outpatient palliative care at both Parnassus and Mission Bay, and inpatient palliative care at SF General Hospital. Call 415-502-6861 for more information.

Veterans Affairs (VA) offers palliative care at several locations:
Palo Alto VA Health Care System – contact them through [email protected]
San Francisco VA Medical Center offers hospice and palliative care through Geriatric Services. Call 415-221-4810, ext. 2-3224 for information.

Visiting Angels offers palliative care in several locations:
Burlingame – Call 650-344-2178 for information.
Fremont – Call 510-284-0000 for information.
San Jose – Call 408-241-5100 for information.
Sunnyvale – Call 408-735-0977 for information.

Vitas Healthcare offers palliative care in several locations:
Milpitas – Call 408-964-6800 for information.
San Francisco – Call 415-874-4400 for information.
San Mateo – Call 650-350-1835 for information.

With Grace Hospice and Palliative Care, San Jose Call 408-444-5500 for information.

 

Apathy – description and treatment

Brain Support Network volunteer Denise Dagan came across this article in a recent Parkinson’s Disease (PD) organization’s newsletter about apathy in PD.  Certainly apathy occurs in many of the disorders in the Brain Support Network community as well — especially progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).  That’s why I’m sharing the article within our network.

These statements in the article caught Denise’s eye:

“Persons with apathy generally do not recognize the symptoms, so caregivers will need to bring it to medical attention. … It is important to assess for apathy because those with apathy are 2.5 times more likely to report poor quality of life in comparison to those without apathy. Apathy is also associated with more severe motor impairment. PD patients with apathy are less physically active and may not adhere to medical recommendations. Relationships may suffer as well since caregivers often experience more frustration and stress.”

The author of the article is Rosa Chuang, MD.  She may be familiar to some in our multiple system atrophy (MSA) group.  She used to practice at Stanford but is now in Seattle.

The article is copied below.

Robin

—————————–

www.apdaparkinson.org/community/northwest/about/newsletters/

Apathy in Parkinson’s Disease
Parkinson’s Pathfinder (Newsletter by APDA Northwest)
Summer 2017
By Dr. Rosalind Chuang

Apathy is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease but often times not recognized or commonly mistaken for depression. Some studies show that 30-40% of PD patients have apathy, but the frequency can range from 20-70%, depending on how patients are asked. It can occur at any stage of PD and can even occur before motor symptoms develop. It is important to assess for apathy because those with apathy are 2.5 times more likely to report poor quality of life in comparison to those without apathy. Apathy is also associated with more severe motor impairment. PD patients with apathy are less physically active and may not adhere to medical recommendations. Relationships may suffer as well since caregivers often experience more frustration and stress.

WHAT IS APATHY?

Apathy is defined as:
• Loss of motivation or lack of initiative
• Loss of pleasure
• Decreased goal directed behaviors
• Decreased goal directed cognitive activity
• Decreased interests and emotions (reduced display of emotions)

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT APATHY

A common complaint from family and friends is that the PD patient just “sits around” or “doesn’t seem to care about anything.” Nothing gets done and a person often declines social activities if given a choice. This can be misinterpreted as fatigue, laziness, or lack of empathy/ uncaring.

Persons with apathy generally do not recognize the symptoms, so caregivers will need to bring it to medical attention. Medical providers may ask specific questions from the Starkstein apathy scale to determine apathy. Some questions on the scale include:

• Any interest in learning new things?
• Does anything interest you?
• Do you look for things to do?
• Are you concerned about your condition? Or unconcerned about many things?
• Does someone have to tell you what to do each day? Do you need a push to get started on things?
• Are you neither happy nor sad, just in between?

As you can see, these questions are similar to those to assess for depression, so sometimes it can be difficult to separate apathy from depression. Often times, patients can have both depression and apathy, but in ~10- 28% of time, patients can have apathy alone.

WHY IS IT NOT DEPRESSION?

In both depression and apathy, a person may no longer enjoy things. However, someone with depression may endorse feeling “blue” or sad. Other “negative” symptoms of depression include inappropriate guilt, loss of appetite, loss of sleep, or thoughts of death. An apathetic person does not cry frequently or have suicidal thoughts.

TREATMENT

It is important to evaluate if the symptoms are from apathy alone because it can affect treatment. If apathy is associated with depression or anxiety, treatment of co-morbid conditions can help reduce apathy. Sometimes isolated apathy can also respond to the SSRIs used to treat depression, but generally studies don’t show good response. Dopamine medications (levodopa or dopamine agonists) may also improve apathy. (In some patient who have undergone deep brain stimulation for PD, rapid withdrawal of their PD medications resulted in apathy.) In one trial, PD apathy responded to rivastigmine, a medication used for dementia, even though the patients did not actually have dementia.

For isolated apathy, I generally recommend non-pharmacologic treatment. These include:

• Write down at least 3 daily goals and 3 weekly goals. These goals can be physical, social, or thinking activities.
• Daily goals should be specific and can be reasonably achieved.
• Create a schedule: be specific when each task will should be accomplished.
• Review the written list at breakfast, lunch and dinner to remind yourself of the next goal.
• Cross off each task as you complete them.
• Say “yes” to at least one thing every day even if you don’t feel like it.
• Maintain routine: continue to do things you used to do, even if you don’t feel like it.
• Recall an activity that you used to enjoy and try to restart that activity.
• Exercise even if you don’t feel like it.
• Must leave the house at least once a day

Even though apathy is not as easily treated as the motor symptoms of PD or other non-motor symptoms such as depression, simply recognizing and understanding apathy is an important part of overall management of Parkinson’s disease.

July 2017 Parkinson’s Support Group Meetings – Guest Speakers – NorCal + Central CA

Here’s a list of guest speakers at many Northern California and Central California Parkinson’s Disease (PD) support group meetings for July 2017.

With my Brain Support Network atypical parkinsonism (DLB, PSP, MSA, CBD) hat on, these meetings are especially appealing to me (because of the guest speakers or topics) BUT remember that these are PD support group meetings:

* Lodi, Monday, 7/3: a neurologist is speaking on Parkinson’s and essential tremor. I know nothing about this neurologist but it seems to be a unique opportunity to hear a neurologist speak in Lodi.

* Soquel, Wednesday, 7/5: physical therapist addresses practical solutions to daily challenges

* Yuba City, Monday, 7/10: social worker talks about the importance of sleep for caregivers. Hopefully everyone in this area knows about the Del Oro Caregiver Resource Center. If not, please attend the talk just to learn about their services.

* Bakersfield, Tuesday, 7/11: fitness instructor demonstrating exercises and yoga

* Turlock, Wednesday, 7/12: social worker describes coping skills for dealing with Parkinson’s (for both those with a diagnosis and caregivers). Certainly many of these coping skills will be applicable to those in Brain Support Network.

* Palo Alto/Avenidas, Wednesday, 7/12: a palliative care social worker and hospice nurse will be addressing palliative care and hospice at home for those with neurological disorders (not just Parkinson’s). Many in the Brain Support Network group apply for palliative care. Come learn about what this is!

* Walnut Creek, Saturday, 7/15: movement disorder specialist Salima Brillman, MD, will be talking about the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s. She is very familiar with the disorders in our group.

* Sacramento/Arden Arcade, Thursday, 7/20: an excellent physical therapist addresses physical therapy for PD. She may be familiar with the disorders in our group.

Generally, I recommend driving no more than 30 minutes to attend any of these meetings. If you attend a meeting and learn anything, please share with me so that I can share with others!

Do you need to know the support group meeting location, day/time, contact info, and how to RSVP if required? Please refer to the Stanford Parkinson’s website for all Northern and Central California support groups:

parkinsons.stanford.edu/support_groups.html

As always, I’ve deleted the deep brain stimulation-related talks.

Robin
———————————

Lodi
Monday, 7/3, 10-11am
Guest Speaker: Mohammad Kazmi, MD, neurologist, Lodi
Memorial Hospital, Lodi
Topic: Parkinson’s Disease and Essential Tremor
RSVP?: No.

 

Soquel (Santa Cruz County)
Wednesday, 7/5, 1-2:30pm
Guest Speaker: Ruby Straehley, PT, physical therapist
Topic: Practical solutions to everyday challenges facing those with Parkinson’s
RSVP?: No.

 

Yuba City (Tri-Counties)
Monday, 7/10, 1-2pm
Guest Speaker: Dorene Fanning, LCSW, family consultant, Del Oro
Caregiver Resource Center
Topic: Insights into challenges and the importance of sleep for caregivers
RSVP?: No.

 

Bakersfield
Tuesday, 7/11, 2-4pm
Guest Speaker: Deb McCormack, Bakersfield Mind & Body Studio
Topic: Exercises and yoga for PD
RSVP?: Yes to group leaders Linda Feist, 661-304-9227, or Bill
Burgemaster, 661-343-2707

 

Pacific Grove (Monterey County)
Tuesday, 7/11, 3-4:30pm
Program: Discussion groups – people with Parkinson’s and care partners
RSVP?: No.

 

Davis – regular and caregivers groups together
Wednesday, 7/12, 12:45-2:15pm (special day/time for July)
Guest Speaker: Marg Bartosek
Topic: Experiential presentation of Feldenkrais awareness through movement
RSVP?: No.

 

Turlock
Wednesday, 7/12, 1-2pm
Guest Speaker: Nancy Neufled Silva, PhD, LCSW, counselor, Turlock
Topic: Coping skills in dealing with PD for patients and caregivers
RSVP?: No.

 

Palo Alto/Avenidas
Wednesday, 7/12, 2-3:30pm
Guest Speakers: Libby Hagman, RN, clinical outreach coordinator, and Anthony Lupian, MSW, Transitions program coordinator, Mission Hospice and Home Care, San Mateo
Topic: Palliative care, hospice at home, and hospice house for Parkinson’s – recommended services and what’s new
RSVP?: No.

 

Sonoma/Vintage House
Thursday, 7/13, 10-11am
Guest Speaker: Margot Schaal, certified Feldenkrais practitioner
Topic: Feldenkrais
RSVP?: No.

 

Walnut Creek (Mt. Diablo)
Saturday, 7/15, 9am-noon (speaker 10:45am-11:45am)
Guest Speaker: Salima Brillman, MD, movement disorder specialist, The
Parkinson’s Institute, Sunnyvale
Topic: Diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s
RSVP?: No.

 

Elk Grove
Wednesday, 7/19, 10-11:30am
Guest Speaker: Christy Adams, RN, MPH, trauma prevention coordinator,
UC Davis
Topic: A matter of balance
RSVP?: No.

 

Merced
Thursday, 7/20, 10am-noon
Guest Speaker: Lisa Clawson, LVN, HealthSouth Rehabilitation, Modesto
Topic: Rehab services for PD
RSVP?: No.

 

Sacramento/Arden Arcade
Thursday, 7/20, 10am-noon
Guest Speaker: Christine Shade, DPT, physical therapist, Kaiser Roseville
Topic: Physical therapy and outdoor exercises for PD
RSVP?: No.

 

Mill Valley (Marin County)
Friday, 7/28, 1-3pm (guest speaker 1-2pm)
Guest Speaker: James Nevin, Sr., attorney
Topic: Estate planning and end of life issues
RSVP?: No.

 

Webinar Notes – Sleep Issues in LBD, MSA, and PD

On June 22nd, the Lewy Body Dementia Association (lbda.org) hosted a good one-hour webinar on sleep problems in Lewy Body Dementia (LBD).  This post provides the Brain Support Network notes about the webinar.

Most of the webinar is of relevance to sleep issues in Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) as well.

The presenter, a sleep disorders neurologist at UCLA, addressed these topics:
* function of sleep
* how much sleep do we need
* obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)
* REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD)
* restless legs syndrome (RLS)
* insomnia
* conclusions about RBD and DLB

I was surprised that excessive daytime sleepiness was not addressed during the presentation. I suppose since the sponsoring pharmaceutical company is studying a drug for RBD, that was really the focus.

The highlight of the webinar was the question-and-answer session, which was well-facilitated by Angela Taylor of the LBDA. The questions were about:
* RLS and diabetic neuropathy
* excessive daytime sleepiness
* napping
* melatonin dosage
* neurodegenerative disease risk

Note that the presenter sometimes uses the term Dementia with Lewy Bodies.  “Lewy body dementia” is a term that includes both DLB and Parkinson’s Disease Dementia.

My detailed notes from the webinar (including the question-and-answer session) are below.

The presentation is here:
lbda.org/downloads/lbda-sleep-webinar-slides.pdf

The webinar recording is here:
youtube.com/watch?v=bnHQwduxGSA
(Note: there’s a problem with the slides for the first eight minutes or so.)

Robin

———————–

Robin’s Notes from

LBDU Webinar: Sleep Issues in LBD
June 22, 2017

Presenter: Dr. Alon Y. Avidan, MD, MPH, Professor of Neurology, Director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center.

Theory that sleep is restorative. Memory is consolidated. If you don’t sleep well, your memory and cognitive abilities may decline.

Sleep is rejuvenative. Brain’s glymphatic system is most active during sleep. The brain “takes out the trash” while we sleep. Trash = byproducts and toxins. The function of the glymphatic system was only characterized in the last few years. Lack of good sleep puts the patient at risk for more disease and poor health.

14:13 Most adults need 7-8 hours. If less than 4 hours, you are putting yourself at risk for heart disease, depression, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Sleep needed varies by age groups. National Sleep Foundation recommends 7-9 hours for adults. Later, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends 7-8 hours; less or more than that is not good. Healthy sleep duration is 7 hours or more each night (regularly). Good sleep on weekends is important.

Less than 7 hours/night regularly, puts you at risk for weight gain and obesity, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, stroke, depression, increased risk of death, depressed immune function, increased pain, poor performance, increased risk, and increased accidents.

16:48 Sleep is often affected by aging process but it doesn’t have to be this way. As we age, we have more pain, more sleep apnea, more RLS, more comorbid disorders, and take more medications. Don’t be satisfied with 4-5 hours of sleep. Make an effort to improve sleep quality and duration.

OSA
18:10 Obstructive sleep apnea is affected by age, weight, alcohol. Alcohol can convert someone from simple snoring to sleep apnea. 20-80 times to stop breathing in one hour! CPAP therapy is gold-standard treatment.

RBD
20:20 This is the most important sleep disorder in those with LBD. REM sleep behavior disorder is a type of parasomnia (abnormal behavior in sleep). Muscles are supposed to be paralyzed when dreaming. In RBD, patients act out dreams. Concerns are self-injury or injury of bed partner. Incomplete transition from REM sleep to non-REM sleep (where you are nearly awake). REM sleep without atonia.

RBD is common in alpha-synucleinopathies (PD, DLB, MSA). RBD can present before the onset of neurodegenerative disease. Usually 2/3 of patients will develop neurodegenerative disease within 10 years.

Sleep neurologists should tell patients diagnosed with RBD that they are “at risk for dementia later in life.”

RBD is part of the diagnostic criteria for DLB.

Dreams in RBD are rarely pleasant.

26:10 Treatment focuses on safety: bedroom safe; remove hard/sharp objects; sleep in padded mattress; place mattress on floor; cover windows with heavy curtain; use pillow barricades. Until managed, sleep alone. Sleep in sleeping bag until treated. Medications: melatonin (he prefers because it’s the safesty; 5mg up to 15mg), clonazepam (.25 to .5mg; had side effects, such as grogginess).

RBD could be a window of opportunity in DLB. Nelotanserin clinical trial is ending at the end of June 2017. Lead institution is Mayo.

RLS
28:19 Restless legs syndrome. Urge to move the legs occur primarily in the evening. Many LBD patients have this condition. Very bothersome. Often physicians don’t know how to diagnose RLS. Symptoms get worse with inactivity. Difficult to relieve leg discomfort. Driving or flying long distances – especially difficult. Effective treatments available.

Insomnia
29:46 One-third of patients with neurodegenerative disease are affected by insomnia, particularly middle-of-the-night insomnia. Alcohol is not a good idea for insomnia. Get out of bed; avoid staying in bed awake. Talk to your MD about potential treatments.

30:40 Conclusions
* sleep disorder increases odds of DLB by 5x over Alzheimer’s
* RBD is strongest prognosticator of dementia, including DLB

Future research into RBD will focus on:
* benefit of exercise
* role of dietary factors (dairy products, saturated and animal fat, lower use of Mediterranean diet and of non-steroid drugs)
* role of melatonin as a neuroprotective agent
* establish guideline about agents that can help prevent phenoconversion from RBD to DLB

 

31:48 Notes from Question-and-Answer session:

Q: RLS and diabetic neuropathy
A: Common situation. The medication gabapentin can address both problems. Talk to a PCP. RLS diagnosis must be validated.

 

Q: Excessive daytime sleepiness is common. How do you know if sleepiness is excessive?
A: Well-validated measures of EDS to assess what is abnormal and what is not. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) can be used. You can find the scale online. Falling asleep immediately upon watching TV at any time of day, for example, is excessive.

 

Q: What is the maximum number of nap-time that will not disrupt nighttime sleep?
A: If “hours,” it’s already not good. Naps should be short (15-20 minutes) and strategic (1-3pm). Sleep is not like a bank account.

 

Q: What treatments are there for EDS?
A: Stimulants should not be the focus. We should use good sleep to give us energy. Exception to the “avoid medications” rule is narcolepsy, which is very rare. Shift workers or patients with sleep apnea who are still fatigued could be given stimulants. But I would never give someone with EDS a stimulant because this doesn’t address the problem of poor sleep. First find out what is causing the sleep disruption. One thing that can be helpful in treating LBD sleepiness is light. Light exposure, especially early in the day, is important. We don’t have good data on wake-promoting agents in LBD.

 

Q: Dosage of melatonin for LBD for sleep or RBD?
A: Melatonin for RBD – high-dose melatonin (3mg, increasing by 3mg every two weeks up to 12mg). We have good data on RBD. Could consider 5mg sustained release melatonin. This increases by 5mg every two weeks up to 15mg. If 12mg or 15mg don’t work, consider adding clonazepam. If that doesn’t work, look again into the cause of RBD. Often RBD is due to other substance patient is taking but forgot reporting initially to MD.

Low-dose melatonin (.5mg) – circadian rhythm problems. Middle-dose melatonin – insomnia.

 

Q: Is RLS or sleep apnea associated with neurodegenerative diseases?
A: No data whatsoever that RLS puts you at risk for neurodegenerative disease. Nor is it a prognosticator.

Untreated sleep apnea puts you at risk for accelerated neurodegeneration, if you already have a predisposition for development of Alzheimer’s.

 

Q: If you have RBD and receive treatment for it, can you reduce risk of neurodegenerative disease?
A: We don’t know. If you use clonazepam, you are probably not going to reduce risk of disease. We don’t know for sure about melatonin. Some believe that melatonin is neuroprotective. But patients taking melatonin don’t have slower progression towards neurodegeneration. Disease process isn’t reversed.

RBD is a great biomarker. This means that we can use it to test neuroprotective agents.

 

Angela Taylor, LBDA:
LBDA research page — lbda.org/participate-in-research

Enrollment for one RBD study has been extended.

 

Sleep issues in LBD and MSA, Thursday 6/22, webinar

The Lewy Body Dementia Association (lbda.org) is hosting a webinar this Thursday 6/22 at 11:30am California time on sleep issues in Lewy body dementia (LBD).  The content also applies to those in the multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD).

Sleep issues to be addressed by a UCLA sleep disorders specialist include REM sleep behavior disorder, daytime sleepiness, restless leg syndrome, insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and periodic limb movement.  There is no charge to attend.  Details below.

Updated, 6/23/17:  See our blog post of the notes from this webinar:

www.brainsupportnetwork.org/webinar-notes-sleep-issues-in-lbd-msa-and-pd/

Robin

—————————–

lbda.org/sleep

Webinar – Sleep Issues in LBD
Thursday, June 22, 2017
2:30 pm Eastern Time

Did you know that most people with LBD have at least one sleep disorder?
From REM sleep behavior disorder, which causes frightening dreams that sufferers often act out, to daytime sleepiness, restless leg syndrome, insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and periodic limb movement, those with LBD often have sleep issues that dramatically effect their quality of life and can lead sometime lead to injuries to themselves and others. In addition, the sleep disorders associated with LBD can begin years to decades earlier than other common LBD symptoms such as memory loss or confused thinking.

Join LBDU and Dr. Alon Y. Avidan, MD, MPH, Director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center for a free, informative webinar on sleep issues in Lewy Body Dementia.

Dr. Avidan will explain changes in sleep patterns with aging specific to Lewy Body Dementia. He also will share information about the management of LBD-related sleep disorders, as well as treatment strategies, ongoing research and clinical trials.

Presenter:
Dr. Alon Y. Avidan, MD, MPH
Professor of Neurology
Vice Chair Clinical and Educational Affairs
Department of Neurology
Director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

“Dreams and Brain Disease: REM Sleep Cells Linked to Disorders”

This article on last week’s Live Science (livescience.com) is about REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is acting out dreams. This symptom in common in Parkinson’s Disease, Dementia with Lewy Bodies, and Multiple System Atrophy. The vast majority of those with RBD have one of these three disorders and often one of these neurological disorders comes to light years (or decades) after the first signs of RBD.

Here’s a link to the full article:
http://www.livescience.com/59300-brain-cells-linked-to-dreaming-found.html

Live Science
Health
Dreams and Brain Disease: REM Sleep Cells Linked to Disorders
By Tracy Staedter, Live Science Contributor
May 30, 2017 07:06pm ET

June 2017 Parkinson’s Support Group Meetings – Guest Speakers – NorCal + Central CA

Here’s a list of guest speakers at many Northern California and Central California PD support group meetings for June 2017.

With my Brain Support Network atypical parkinsonism (DLB, PSP, MSA, CBD) hat on, these meetings are especially appealing to me (because of the guest speakers or topics) BUT remember that these are PD support group meetings:

Santa Rosa, Sat 6/3:  Neurologist speaks about mood, cognitive, and sleep disorders in PD.  This might be applicable to those with DLB and MSA.

Roseville, Tues 6/6:  Learn from a pharmaceutical company rep about a new drug for hallucinations and delusions.  This is applicable to those with DLB.

Sonoma/Vintage House, Thurs 6/8:  Topic is balance and fall prevention.  Speaker unlikely to know about any of the atypical parkinsonism disorders specifically but she probably has some good suggestions.

Stockton, Thurs 6/8:  Medical marijuana is the topic

Gilroy, Mon 6/12:  Listening to and discussing Michael J. Fox Foundation podcasts on sleep disturbances and urinary problems in Parkinson’s.  This is applicable to those with DLB and MSA especially.

Pacific Grove (Monterey County), Tues 6/13:  Speech therapist talks about speech and swallowing changes in PD.  This is applicable to all the disorders in our group.

Palo Alto Young Onset Parkinson’s Group Tues 6/13:  Medical cannabis is the topic

Palo Alto/Avenidas, Wed 6/14:  Manager of Stanford’s Farewell to Falls program will be speaking on the topic of fall prevention.  This is applicable to everyone in our group, whether you can take advantage of Stanford’s program or not.

Sacramento/Arden Arcade, Thurs 6/15:  Movement disorder specialist Lin Zhang, MD, PhD will be addressing the non-motor symptoms of PD.  These symptoms are part of the disorders in our group.

Mill Valley, Fri 6/13:  Registered dietitian speaks about nutrition and PD.  Most of the information should be applicable to those in our group.

Fremont, Mon 6/26:  Movement disorder specialist Han Lee, MD will be the guest speaker.  Unfortunately we don’t know his topic.  But he is very familiar with all the disorders in our group.

Generally, I recommend driving no more than 30 minutes to attend any of these meetings.  If you attend a meeting and learn anything, please share with me so that I can share with others!

Do you need to know the support group meeting location, day/time, contact info, and how to RSVP if required?  Please refer to the Stanford
Parkinson’s website for all Northern and Central California support groups:

parkinsons.stanford.edu/support_groups.html

As always, I’ve deleted the deep brain stimulation-related talks.

Robin

**********************

Half Moon Bay
Thursday, 6/1, 3-4pm
Guest Speaker:  Cherry Tuck, PD fighter
Topic:  Her journey
RSVP?:  No.

San Jose/Willow Glen
Friday, 6/2, 10am-noon (program starts about 10:20am)
Program:  Break into two groups — those with PD and caregivers
RSVP?:  No.

Santa Rosa (Sonoma County)
Saturday, 6/3, 1-3:15pm  (guest speaker 1-2pm)
Guest Speaker:  Allan Bernstein, MD, neurologist, Santa Rosa
Topic:  Mood, cognitive, and sleep disorders in Parkinson’s
RSVP?:  No.

Lodi
Monday, 6/5, 10-11am
Guest Speaker:  Dianna Powell, San Joaquin County coordinator, Legal Services of Northern California
Topic:  HICAP and Medicare updates
RSVP?:  No.

Roseville
Tuesday, 6/6, 1:30-3pm
Guest Speaker:  Saul Avila, Acadia Pharmaceuticals
Topic:  Nuplazid – new drug for psychosis and schizophrenia associated with Parkinson’s
RSVP?:  No.

San Francisco/UCSF Young Onset Parkinson’s Group
Tuesday, 6/6, 6:30-8pm
Guest Speaker:  Cameron Wisdom, Mission Bay Rock Steady Boxing Gym, San Francisco
RSVP?:  Yes, preferred to Monica Volz, [email protected]

Soquel (Santa Cruz County)
Wednesday, 6/7, 1-2:30pm
Guest Speaker:  Jenifer Armstrong, PharmD, pharmacist, Santa Cruz
Topic:  PD – Inside and out of the prescription bottle
RSVP?:  No.

Chico
Wednesday, 6/7, 1:30-3pm
Guest Speaker:  Attorney, Corporon Law Offices
Topic:  Long-term care planning (trusts, wills, and other legal documents)
RSVP?:  No.

Sonoma/Vintage House
Thursday, 6/8, 10-11am
Guest Speaker:  Vanessa Kettler, balance instructor
Topic:  Balance and fall prevention
RSVP?:  No.

Stockton
Thursday, 6/8, 1:30-3pm
Guest Speaker:  Christopher Trinchera
Topic:  Medical marijuana
RSVP?:  No.

St. Helena/Rianda House  (new group)
Thursday, 6/8, 3:30-4:30pm
Guest Speaker:  Barbara Brown, PT, physical therapist, St. Helena Hospital
Topic:  Importance of a PT’s expertise in a PD care plan
RSVP?:  No.

Fresno
Saturday, 6/10, 10am-noon
Guest Speaker:  Beate Ritz, MD, PhD, UCLA
Topic:  PEG (Parkinson’s, Environment & Genes) study at UCLA
RSVP?:  No.

Yuba City (Tri-Counties)
Monday, 6/12, 1-2pm
Guest Speaker:  Carly Pacheco, deputy director, FREED Center for Independent Living, Grass Valley
Topic:  FREED Center’s services
RSVP?:  No.

Gilroy
Monday, 6/12, noon-1:30pm (new time)
Program:  Listening to and discussing Michael J. Fox Foundation podcasts on sleep disturbances and urinary problems in Parkinson’s
RSVP?:  No.

Bakersfield
Tuesday, 6/13, 2-4pm
Guest Speaker:  Lin Zhang, MD, PhD, movement disorder specialist, UC Davis, Sacramento
Topic:  PD and the management of off episodes with Apokyn
RSVP?:  Yes to group leaders Linda Feist, 661-304-9227, or Bill Burgemaster, 661-343-2707

Pacific Grove (Monterey County)
Tuesday, 6/13, 3-4:30pm
Guest Speaker:  Katie Pietsch, SLP, speech therapist, CHOMP
Topic:  Think LOUD! – Speech and swallowing changes in PD
RSVP?:  No.

Palo Alto Young Onset Parkinson’s Group
Tuesday, 6/13, 6:30-8pm
Guest Speaker:  Helen Garvy, PD advocate and care partner
Topic:  Medical cannabis for PD
RSVP?:  Preferred, if this is your first time.  RSVP at least 24 hours in advance to Martha Gardner, group leader, email [email protected]

Turlock
Wednesday, 6/14, 1-2pm
Guest Speaker:  Robert McCulla, DDS, dentist
Topic:  Parkinson’s and sleep
RSVP?:  No.

Palo Alto/Avenidas
Wednesday, 6/14, 2-3:30pm
Guest Speaker:  Ellen Corman, manager, Farewell to Falls, Stanford Health Care
Topic:  Fall prevention in Parkinson’s
RSVP?:  No.

Sacramento/Arden Arcade
Thursday, 6/15, 10am-noon
Guest Speaker:  Lin Zhang, MD, PhD, movement disorder specialist, UC
Davis, Sacramento
Topic:  PD – more than motor symptoms
RSVP?:  No.

Walnut Creek (Mt. Diablo)
Saturday, 6/17, 9am-noon  (speaker 10:45am-11:45am)
Guest Speaker:  Nijee Luthra, MD, PhD, movement disorders fellow, UCSF
Topic:  Advances in treatment of Parkinson’s
RSVP?:  No.

Lincoln
Tuesday, 6/20, 10-11am
Guest Speaker:  Millie Nunez, PD cycling instructor, Sun City Lincoln Hills
Topic:  Nutrition and forced exercise
RSVP?:  No.

Auburn
Tuesday, 6/20, 1:30-3pm
Guest Speaker:  Stephanie Fiola, RN, AbbVie Pharmaceuticals
Topic:  Discovering Duopa – carbidopa/levodopa eternal suspension
RSVP?:  No.

Modesto
Wednesday, 6/21, 1:30-3:30pm
Guest Speaker:  Carlos Becerra, personal trainer, Alpha Fitness
RSVP?:  No.

Auburn (special bonus meeting at same location as regular meeting)
Thursday, 6/22, 6-7:30pm
Guest Speaker:  Robert Ghelfi, MD, Northern California Surgical Group, Redding
Topic:  Stem cell therapy for PD
RSVP?:  No.

Mill Valley (Marin County)
Friday, 6/23, 1-3pm  (guest speaker 1-2pm)
Guest Speaker:  Sue Weiss, RD, dietitian, Kaiser San Rafael
Topic:  Nutrition and Parkinson’s
RSVP?:  No.

Fremont
Monday, 6/26, 7-9:30pm
Guest Speaker:  Han Lee, MD, movement disorder specialist, Kaiser San Leandro
RSVP?:  No.