“What is the difference between Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer’s disease?”

“Medical News Today” (medicalnewstoday.com) recently updated its comparison of Lewy body dementia (LBD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD).  It’s rather basic but might be helpful to newcomers to the LBD community.  See:

www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/lewy-body-dementia-vs-alzheimers

Especially note this table comparing symptoms:

 

Lewy body dementia Alzheimer’s disease
Symptoms Symptoms include:
• changes in thinking and reasoning
• confusion and alertness that varies from one day to the next
• visual hallucinations
• delusions
• sleep disturbances
• memory loss that is less prominent than in Alzheimer’s but still significant
• slowness and changes in movement
• difficulty interpreting visual information
Symptoms may worsen over time. Mild symptoms include:
• memory loss
• repeating questions
• wandering and getting lost
• losing and misplacing items
• changes in personality and mood
• anxiety
• aggression
• judgment difficulties
• taking more time to complete everyday tasks
Age of onset Occurs between 50–85 years. Occurs during the mid-60s, although it can be earlier.
Causes Researchers have not identified a cause. Causes include a combination of lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors.
Risk factors Risk factors include:
• older age
• Parkinson’s disease
• REM sleep disorder
Risk factors include:
• older age
• genetics
• cardiovascular conditions
• head injury
Treatment Medication, lifestyle changes, cognitive and behavioral therapy can treat symptoms and slow disease progression. Medication, lifestyle changes, cognitive and behavioral therapy can treat symptoms and slow disease progression.
Life expectancy Most people live for an average of 5–8 years but could be up to 20 years. Most people live for an average of 4–8 years but could be up to 20 years.
Outlook There is no cure, but treatment can help manage symptoms. The symptoms may vary from day to day. There is no cure, while symptoms worsen over time. Medications can help manage symptoms and slow disease progression.

 

The “Treatment” and “Diagnosis” sections are a little weak IMHO.

Robin