Aug 2018, Speakers at Parkinson’s Support Group Meetings, Northern CA

In August 2018, some Parkinson’s support group meetings in Northern and Central California have guest speakers that may be of interest to those in the Brain Support Network community:

San Jose/Willow Glen
Friday, 8/3, 10am-noon (speaker begins about 10:15am)
Guest Speaker: Harvey Sackett, Esquire
Topic: Filing for Social Security disability benefits with a PD diagnosis
RSVP?: No.

Half Moon Bay
Friday, 8/3, 1-2pm
Guest Speaker: Jetta Van Hemert, PT, physical therapist, Half Moon Bay Senior Center
Topic: Rosen method and exercise for Parkinson’s
RSVP?: No.

San Andreas (Calaveras County)
Tuesday, 8/7, 10am-noon (speaker usually begins at 10:30am)
Guest Speaker: Bailey Freitas, SLP, speech therapist, Sonora Regional Hospital and other places
RSVP?: No.

Placerville
Tuesday, 8/7, 1:30-3pm
Program: Watch “Freezing or Sweating Falls When Walking with PD” webinar from the Parkinson’s Foundation
RSVP?: No.

Menlo Park/Little House
Wednesday, 8/8, 2-3:30pm
Guest Speaker: Ellen Corman, director, Stanford’s Farewell to Falls Program
Topic: Fall prevention in Parkinson’s
RSVP?: No.

Santa Rosa (Sonoma County)
Saturday, 8/11, 1-3:15pm (speaker from 1-2pm)
Guest Speaker: Diana Partovi, neuropsychologist, VA
Topic: Managing cognitive changes in Parkinson’s
RSVP?: No.

Tracy
Monday, 8/13, 10am-noon
Program: Dance for Parkinson’s demonstration class led by Rose, Dance for Parkinson’s representative
RSVP?: No.

Pacific Grove (Monterey County)
Tuesday, 8/14, 3-4:30pm
Guest Speaker: Jennifer D’Attilio, SLP, speech therapist
Topic: Parkinson’s Voice Project
RSVP?: No.

Palo Alto YOPD (Young Onset PD)/Stanford
Tuesday, 8/14, 6:30-8pm
Guest Speaker: James Lu, DPT, LAc, acupuncturist, Zhu’s Neuro-Acupuncture and Rehabilitation Center, San Jose
Topic: Scalp acupuncture for PD
RSVP?: Yes, if this is your first time attending. Please email group leader John Mamin, [email protected]

For meeting location and other details, see the Stanford Parkinson’s Outreach website.

 

“Watch Out for These Hidden Costs of Assisted Living” (Samada.com)

This is a terrific article on the *possible* “hidden costs” of assisted living.  It’s terrific because it is very detailed, listing all kinds of costs.
Robin
———————–
Watch Out for These Hidden Costs of Assisted Living

Here are additional charges that may not be included in the basic fee
By Kaya Laterman
Samada.com
May 2, 2018

Once you or loved one has made the decision that assisted living would be a good move, the next question is usually: How much will it cost? The national median cost for assisted living is $3,750 per month, but prices vary widely from state to state and facility to facility.

The way assisted living facilities break down their costs also differs from facility to facility. Many residences charge a basic fee, which includes rent, meals, housekeeping, access to activities and exercise. Then they will group additional services, like therapies and medication disbursement, into different payment tiers. Other facilities consider themselves all-inclusive, but may have add-on fees, which can increase a monthly bill by several hundred or even thousands of dollars.

Some facilities, after a periodic assessment, may either try to bump a resident’s payment plan up a tier or start charging more for added services. You are entitled to contest the additional services and fees as long as you can prove they are not needed, which may require the assistance of a geriatric care manager, social worker or other professionals who can attest to that.

It’s important to read the contract carefully and make sure the costs of all services are clearly indicated. Services that may incur additional fees can include:

Hygiene Costs

* Dressing. Fees can be split for dressing in the morning and undressing in the evening.
* Bathing. Fees may be different for full help with showering or having someone in the room while the individual showers.
* Bathroom/incontinence care. Some individuals may need help getting to and from the bathroom, sitting and standing, wiping, and changing adult diapers.
* Laundry

Medical Costs

* Health screening before moving in. Some facilities include this in their overall pricing upon move-in, but others many indicate it on the bill as a separate one-time charge.
* Medication management. Depending on the needs of the resident, staff may simply remind a resident to take his or her daily dosage, while other facilities will store and administer medications and record medication disbursement.
* On-site pharmacy or doctor access. Does the facility have a doctor or pharmacy onsite? You may be charged an additional fee for the convenience, disguised as a monthly “facility fee.” However, the services the doctor renders or the price of the prescription may be covered by Medicare or Medicaid.
* Treatment for temporary wounds or illness. Some facilities will tack on an additional fee for cleaning out and monitoring wounds from a fall or helping a resident get over a long-lasting flu.
* Blood pressure monitoring
* Blood glucose monitoring and insulin injections

Mobility and Other Care Costs

* Escort to and from the dining room or activity center
* Checking in on resident at regular intervals
* Reminders. This may include reminders to go to the bathroom every few hours or before bed, to take medication or to get to weekly activities and therapies on time.
* Use of gym or spa, if available on premises
* Transportation to area shops, doctor’s office
* Admission/Discharge. A one-time admissions fee may show up on bills under names like Service Initiation Fee or Community Service Fee. Also, look at the fine print in the contract for discharge policies to make sure you are entitled to a refund for prepaid services that were not used.
* Extra fee to deep-clean the bathroom. Hard to believe, but although most cleaning services are part of a standard monthly charge, some facilities may add on a deep-cleaning charge from time to time.
* Telephone

Other Hidden Costs

These are costs that aren’t charged by the assisted living facility itself, but ones that you or a loved one might incur as part of the transition to assisted living.

* Moving costs. Includes hiring a junk removal service, paying for movers and/or the costs involved in selling a house
* Travel expenses
* Lawyer or elder care manager fees

Kaya Laterman is a freelance reporter based in Brooklyn, N.Y.

“Sometimes Patients Simply Need Other Patients” (NYT)

This is a good article on the value of online patient groups:

www.nytimes.com/2018/07/09/upshot/sometimes-patients-simply-need-other-patients.html

The New Health Care
Sometimes Patients Simply Need Other Patients
Using the internet for a diagnosis is not recommended, but there’s great power in sharing stories.
By Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt
The New York Times
July 9, 2018

Brain Support Network has a list of online groups for those coping with Lewy body dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, and corticobasal degeneration.

 

Our 15th year of caregiver-only support group meetings

Tonight, Brain Support Network is starting its 15th year of holding caregiver-only support group meetings for those dealing with Lewy Body Dementia, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, Multiple System Atrophy, and Corticobasal Degeneration. Thanks to all of our volunteers for making possible this milestone.

We meet nine times a year in San Mateo. Let us know if you’d like to be added to our support group meeting reminder email list.